Meat

 

sand mandala death ritual

 Kamal Ratna Tuladhar on WikiMedia Commons: “Newar Buddhists of Nepal make a mandala (sand painting) depicting the Buddha as part of the death rituals on the third day after death and preserve it for four days.”

Trigger warning for vegans, vegetarians, and people who will not occupy their current body forever: This post is about ingesting–and inhabiting–meat.

So this happened: I started to be aware that I would die someday. No, more honestly, I became aware of that deep-down, subtle snicker that says I am the inexplicable exception to this reality, universal but for me. Continue reading

Bujo Lenormand

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Long before I started to amass various decks of cards, I amassed 1) big plans and 2) blank notebooks. The idea was to fill up 2) in order to execute 1).  The reality is that innumerable black journals have continued to appear and disappear throughout my home according to their own mysterious laws. Some are pretty much filled, others pristine or with just one tantalizing entry from a rapidly receding year. And yes, I’ve done a bunch of things over the years, but not necessarily according to “plan.” Continue reading

Fool’s Gold

 

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Albrecht Durer, title page from Sebastian Brant’s Narranschiff, 1494

Some 15 years ago, Brian Williams created a Tarot based on humanist Sebastian Brant’s illustrated tome of moral commentary, the Narranschiff, or Ship of Fools. It was inevitable that my interest in the Ship of Fools Tarot would be reignited. Brant’s 15th century work is not only fascinating in its own right, but it was undoubtedly an influence on Jost Amman, whose 16th century deck of 52 playing cards has become a bit of an idee fixe for me of late. Continue reading

Of Printing Pads and Cabbage Stalks

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Jost Amman playing cards, 1588 (Edition Leipzig, 1967)

Seems there is a small flurry of interest lately in the lovely 16th century German deck of cards by Jost Amman. This is the deck featured in the intriguing novel The Stockholm Octavo by Karen Engelmann (and in a recent blog post).  Most people interested in this deck will turn to the very affordable reproduction by Historic Games. But the (out of print) 1967 reproduction by Edition Leipzig comes with an extensive introduction to the cards by one Erwin Kohlmann. He’s got some fascinating tidbits for those eager to know more: Continue reading

The Tarot of Chinoiserie

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Tarocchi Orientali Foudraz 1845

Chinoiserie: the imitation or evocation of Chinese motifs and techniques in Western art, furniture, and architecture, especially in the 18th century.

chicanery:  deception by artful subterfuge or sophistry : trickery Continue reading

Oh look! A chicken! (maybe an egg)

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Medieval chickens and eggs (source unknown)

I’ve been experimenting with the common practice of pulling three cards each morning to say, What will the day be like? I’ve found I assess the day’s spread with an inner criterion I’ll call resonance. When the cards resonate, they articulate the prevailing mood quite exactly.  Not that I knew what the prevailing mood was, beforehand. Up till that moment it was just a swirl of nebulous, disorganized bits of thought and feeling, cloud cover and barometric pressure. Continue reading